Long term simulation – in #12: CCLM Starter Package Support

in #12: CCLM Starter Package Support

The line let "SEC_CHECK=DATE2-DATE1" counts how much time the checking process needs. This is just for information and not necessary for the post-processing of the data. Therefore setting it to SEC_CHECK=1 does not matter.
I experienced some problem with a similar command sometimes in another script. You may try the following instead of using the let command.
SEC_CHECK=$(python -c "print ${DATE2}-${DATE1}")
Anyway, just setting SEC_CHECK=1 is fine, if you do not need the time information for some reason.

  @burkhardtrockel in #5e4efb2

The line let "SEC_CHECK=DATE2-DATE1" counts how much time the checking process needs. This is just for information and not necessary for the post-processing of the data. Therefore setting it to SEC_CHECK=1 does not matter.
I experienced some problem with a similar command sometimes in another script. You may try the following instead of using the let command.
SEC_CHECK=$(python -c "print ${DATE2}-${DATE1}")
Anyway, just setting SEC_CHECK=1 is fine, if you do not need the time information for some reason.

The line let "SEC_CHECK=DATE2-DATE1" counts how much time the checking process needs. This is just for information and not necessary for the post-processing of the data. Therefore setting it to SEC_CHECK=1 does not matter.
I experienced some problem with a similar command sometimes in another script. You may try the following instead of using the let command.
SEC_CHECK=$(python -c "print ${DATE2}-${DATE1}")
Anyway, just setting SEC_CHECK=1 is fine, if you do not need the time information for some reason.